Appeared-to-Blogly

January 4, 2016

Books of 2015

Filed under: Annual Book Log,Life — camcintosh @ 1:51 pm

In keeping with my blogging tradition of posting an annual book log, here is my 2015 showing:

Non-Fiction

  1. Lynne Rudder Baker, Naturalism and the First-Person Perspective (Oxford, 2013).
  2. Jeff Guinn, The Last Gunfight (Simon & Schuster, 2012).
  3. Steve Sheinkin, Lincoln’s Grave Robbers (Scholastic, 2012).
  4. Richard Carwardine, Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power (Vintage, 2007).
  5. Chris Kyle, American Sniper (Harper, 2013).
  6. Peter Kadzis, Blood: Stories of Life and Death from the Civil War (Thunder’s Mouth, 2000).
  7. David Roberts, Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration (W. W. Norton & Co., 2014).
  8. Mitchell Zuckoff, Lost in Shangri-La: A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II (Harper Perennial, 2012).
  9. Richard Taylor, The Disciplined Life (Bethany House, 1962).
  10. Antonio Mendez, Argo: How the CIA and Hollywood Pulled Off the Most Audacious Rescue in History (Penguin Books, 2013).

Fiction

  1. Orson Scott Card, Earth Unaware
  2. Orson Scott Card, Earth Afire
  3. Orson Scott Card, Earth Awakens
  4. H. G. Wells, War of the Worlds
  5. Gary Paulsen, Brian’s Winter
  6. Gary Paulsen, The River
  7. Gary Paulsen, Brian’s Return
  8. Gary Paulsen, Brian’s Hunt
  9. Richard Adams, Watership Down
  10. Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

CoPAn abysmal list, really, as far as philosophy is concerned (Cf. 2013 and 2014). What can I say? The ‘game’ of professional philosophy and its star players disgust me more than ever. As a not-completely-subconcious act of personal protest, I’ve turned to other outlets to scratch inquisitive, creative itches. I still dutifully read the tenure files and enjoy my work. But that’s what it has become. Work. I never saw it that way before. Maybe that’s why I was better at it then. Anyway, the challenge I face this next year will be to keep that original flame of love for Lady Philosophy burning, and to not let the cold drafts of academia blow it out entirely. Here’s to 2016.

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3 Comments »

  1. My first impression was to little philosophy, to little philosophy, to much Lincoln. But later I read your explanation of this fact. It is interesting that American presidents take such big share in your reading. I believe that recently published first volume of biography of Henry Kissinger by British historian Neil Ferguson could be interesting! If history is important part of your reading I recommend some intellectual historical work, in ”no men’s land” between philosophy and history – there are huge number of important books on this topic, I recommend some work by Irish historian Peter Brown (maybe his great biography of Augustine of Hippo).

    Comment by Milos — January 6, 2016 @ 4:07 pm | Reply

  2. Once I got into grad school, I quickly lost a lot of interest in Academic Philosophy. The reasons were varied, but I assume close to yours. In any case, after a detox of a few years, only now have I really started enjoying reading and thinking about philosophy again. Hopefully you make it through– even though I think we are on opposite sides philosophically speaking, I have enjoyed reading your posts.

    Best of luck.

    Comment by jhc — March 27, 2016 @ 7:42 pm | Reply


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